Amy Groesbeck

Project Biologist

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Education
  • M.S., Coastal Resource Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia
  • B.S., Biology (Ecology & Evolution), University of Washington
Specialties
  • Coastal Ecology
  • Fish and Invertebrate Biology
  • Water Quality
  • Quantitative Analysis
  • GIS Mapping

Amy specializes in nearshore applied ecology and natural resource management of coastal environments for coastal communities. She has coordinated with local, state, and federal agencies to develop and complete research investigations covering such topics as fisheries population assessments, commercial fisheries, predator/prey dynamics, and invasive species. These investigations are often collaborations involving communities, Tribes, agencies, and academia. Her research has helped inform strategic risk assessments of human impacts on marine environments as well as research priorities and environmental monitoring strategies among Tribal and First Nation communities and coalitions. She has also developed short- and long-term environmental monitoring plans (e.g., for shellfish and water quality) for community groups, student programs, and Tribal natural resource departments.

Examples of Amy’s project work include the following:

  • Amy provides shellfish aquaculture permitting assistance by preparing Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application packages and Washington Department of Ecology permits.
  • King County Wastewater Treatment Division is undertaking the North Mercer Island Interceptor and Enatai Interceptor Updgrade project. Amy is supporting permitting for this 14,000-foot sewer line replacement by writing the SEPA checklist and critical areas reports for the local jurisdictions (e.g., cities of Bellevue and Mercer Island), conducting code consistency analyses, and preparing mitigation plans.
  • Amy is helping author the Endangered Species Act biological assessment and Essential Fish Habitat analysis for the Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion Project. This $1.2 billion program, conducted by Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, seeks to restore natural delta processes from the Mississippi River by reintroducing fresh water and sediment from the river into the Mid-Barataria Basin.